Do You Owe Back Taxes? Why You Should Stop Panicking and Start Planning!

If you owe back taxes to the IRS, some amount of panic is understandable. After all, the Internal Revenue Service has the power of the federal government in its corner, something no other debt collector can claim. They are considered the most brutal collection agency on the planet.

It is easy to freeze up and just do nothing when you owe back taxes to the IRS, but hiding from, or doing nothing about your tax debt will not make it go away. In fact, ignoring the taxes you owe will only make the situation worse, since interest and penalties can really add up. You alsorisk having your paycheck garnished (the IRS does need a court order to do this) or your bank account levied. The IRS can also file a Notice of Federal Tax Lien making it all but impossible to obtain financing for a car or home.

So instead of panicking about your tax debt and hoping the problem will go away, you need to take some proactive steps. Now is not the time to panic and hide – now is the time to start taking action.

Some of these steps you can do on your own if you’d like, while others will likely require the intervention of an experienced tax resolution expert. Here are some proactive steps you can take to get a handle on your tax debt. If you need help resolving your IRS tax problem, contact us here www.kevinpyoungea.com. We help people with IRS problems every day.

Confirm the Amount Owed

 When you owe back taxes, one of the first things you should do is make sure you really owe the money. The IRS has been known to make mistakes, a lot of mistakes, and the agency is far from foolproof. Contact the IRS or have us do a IRS transcript analysis to determine the amount the IRS claims you owe.

Seek Out Deductions You May Have Missed

At the very least, you may not owe as much as you think you do, and every dollar you can remove from the bill is one more dollar in your favor. Now is the time to scour your past and current tax returns, looking for deductions and tax credits you might have missed.

Unless you are a seasoned tax expert, you will probably need some professional assistance to make this happen. If you are already working with a CPA or tax expert, you can ask them to look at your past tax returnsbut only a tax resolution expert, who helps people like you for a living, can protect your income and assets as you go through the process.

If you missed a few deductions and tax credits along the way, your tax professional can file amended returns on your behalf, lowering the amount of tax debt you owe – and possibly eliminating it altogether.  However, you usually can’t go back more than 3 years to amend returns.

Look for Special Programs You May Qualify For

 The bad news is the IRS wants its money and has the power to collect it.

The good news is the tax agency also offers a number of programs tax filers can use to make the repayment process easier. In some cases, the IRS may even be willing to settle for less, possibly much less, than the total amount of back taxes you owe.

These programs are not available to everyone, and if you have the resources needed to pay your back taxes, the IRS is unlikely to give you much of a break. But if your resources are limited, the tax agency may decide that a small amount of tax repayment is better than none at all.

The first step in the process is finding the programs for which you might qualify, and that will probably require the help of an experiencedtax resolutionexpert.  Most CPAs do not have this experience. Negotiating with the IRS is not an easy thing to do, and you may need help to drive the best bargain and reduce your back taxes. In the end, it may be well worth paying atax reliefexpert to negotiate on your behalf, especially if you end up with a much lower tax bill.

It is easy to panic when you owe back taxes, but you should not let fear get in your way. The longer you ignore the problem, the worse it is likely to get, and the sooner you act, the better off you, and your finances, will be. There is a solution to every IRS problem.  Let us see what IRS tax debt settlement programs you qualify for today.

Call us for a free consultation at (530) 642-8752.

I’m In Tax Trouble, What Are My Options?

A letter from the IRS is rarely a good thing. One of the worst missives to get from the tax man is the CP90 – Final Notice Before Levy. It is a final warning shot to scare you into paying up and should not be ignored.

After an IRS final notice, you could:

  • Pay in full – but if you could afford to do that, you probably already would have done so.
  • Sign on for an installment agreement on your own, with penalties and interest so excessive it will never end.
  • Ignore them and wait for terrible consequences like garnished wages and tax liens. Don’t do this, ever.
  • Contact your tax resolution professional to see what your resolution options are.

The CP90 intends to intimidate you into calling so the IRS can take as much as possible from you even if it leaves you in dire financial straits, unable to pay your bills or support your family.

A better option is to work with a certified tax resolution expert that can negotiate on your behalf for better results. A tax expert can pursue resolutions that would be difficult (if not impossible) to negotiate on your own. Below is a look at four options to deal with tax debt.

Offer in Compromise (OIC)

An offer in compromise (OIC) is an agreement between a taxpayer and the Internal Revenue Service that settles a taxpayer’s tax liabilities for less than the full amount owed. It can be far more reasonable than an IRS installment agreement, but you have to see if you qualify based on your unique financial situation and specific case.

Installment Agreement (IA) or Partial Payment Installment Agreement (PPIA)

These are well-structured installment agreements that can slash penalties by 50%. The IA is an agreement to pay what’s owed in full while a PPIA lets you pay a reduced amount. These agreements generally run 6-72 months,

Penalty Abatement (PA)

This agreement strips away penalties tacked onto your tax balance. Penalties include failure-to-file, failure-to-pay, and failure-to-deposit (for business owners). If you’ve never had a penalty before, a first-time abatement (FTA) penalty waiver may apply. Otherwise, your tax relief consultant can fight for a reasonable cause abatement if any of the following apply:

  • Illness, death, or incapacitation of the taxpayer or their immediate family
  • Fire, casualty, natural disaster, etc. affecting the taxpayer
  • Inability to obtain records and documents

Currently Not Collectible (CNC)

In cases of extreme financial hardship, your tax rep can argue that you can’t afford to pay anything. With this option, your tax debt goes on the back burner, and you make no monthly payments although penalty and interest keep accruing. The big advantage of CNC is that the 10-year statute of limitations on collection keeps ticking so you might be able to ride it out and pay nothing on the tax debt.

If you’ve received an IRS final notice or threatening letter, don’t ignore it. Instead, contact us at (916) 572-7441 to speak with a tax resolution specialist to get the IRS off your back for good.

ARE THERE OPTIONS BY WHICH TO PAY YOUR TAXES??

Pay your taxes on the go using IRS2Go

Paying your taxes won’t slow you down if you’re on the go this summer. You can easily make a payment using the IRS2Go mobile app. The app allows you to pay with your mobile device using your checking or savings account or by debit or credit card.

IRS Direct Pay offers you a free and secure way to pay directly from your bank account, and you can also make a debit or credit card payment through a payment processor for a fee. No part of the fee goes to the IRS.

You can download IRS2Go for free from Google Play, the Apple AppStore or the Amazon AppStore.

Date: August 1, 2017

_____________________________________________________________________

NOTE TO EDITOR: Below are links to help taxpayers find the information they need. IRS.gov

  • Payment Options: Pay Online, Installment Plans and More
  • IRS Taxes – Three Easy Ways to Pay – YouTube

    On Twitter? Send these Tweets:

  • Try #IRS electronic payment options. http://go.usa.gov/3B9jk #taxpayment
  • #IRSDirectPay is free, secure and easy. Schedule a #tax payment; pay directly

    from your bank account. http://go.usa.gov/3B9WJ

  • Need to make a tax payment? #IRSDirectPay #EFTPS http://go.usa.gov/3B9Bh

Selling your home??

Tips to Keep in Mind on Income Taxes and Selling a Home

Homeowners may qualify to exclude from their income all or part of any gain from the sale of their main home.

Below are tips to keep in mind when selling a home:

Ownership and Use. To claim the exclusion, the homeowner must meet the ownership and use tests. This means that during the five-year period ending on the date of the sale, the homeowner must have:

  • Owned the home for at least two years
  • Lived in the home as their main home for at least two years    Gain.  If there is a gain from the sale of their main home, the homeowner may be able to exclude up to $250,000 of the gain from income or $500,000 on a joint return in most cases. Homeowners who can exclude all of the gain do not need to report the sale on their tax return

Loss.  A main home that sells for lower than purchased is not deductible.

Reporting a Sale.  Reporting the sale of a home on a tax return is required if all or part of the gain is not excludable. A sale must also be reported on a tax return if the taxpayer chooses not to claim the exclusion or receives a Form 1099-S, Proceeds from Real Estate Transactions.

Possible Exceptions.  There are exceptions to the rules above for persons with a disability, certain members of the military, intelligence community and Peace Corps workers, among others. More information is available in Publication 523, Selling Your Home.

Worksheets.  Worksheets are included in Publication 523, Selling Your Home, to help you figure the:

  • Adjusted basis of the home sold
  • Gain (or loss) on the sale
  • Gain that can be excluded

Items to Keep In Mind:

  • Taxpayers who own more than one home can only exclude the gain on the sale of their main home. Taxes must paid on the gain from selling any other home.
  • Taxpayers who used the first-time homebuyer credit to purchase their home have special rules that apply to the sale. For more on those rules, see Publication 523. Use the First Time Homebuyer Credit Account Look-up to get account information such as the total amount of your credit or your repayment amount.
  • Work-related moving expenses might be deductible, see Publication 521, Moving Expenses.
  • Taxpayers moving after the sale of their home should update their address with the IRS and the U.S. Postal Service by filing Form 8822, Change of Address.
  • Taxpayers who purchased health coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace should notify the Marketplace when moving out of the area covered by the current Marketplace plan.

Avoid scams. The IRS does not initiate contact using social media or text message. The first contact normally comes in the mail. Those wondering if they owe money to the IRS can view their tax account information on IRS.gov to find out.

Be Aware!

So just for review: The IRS will NEVER call you and demand payment over the phone or request a call back. The IRS will ALWAYS send you mail correspondence, usually certified that you must sign for, demanding payment. And this will usually be after two or three previous written requests for payment. Since I also get these annoying, fraudulent calls I feel it is necessary to reiterate this for my clients and non-clients sake. Have a blessed day!!